Osomatsu-san: Surprisingly Enjoyable

Osomatsu-san is a comedic anime from 2015 to 2016, recently adapted into a manga, brought to us by Pierrot. Yes, the studio that worked on Yu Yu Hakusho & Hikaru no Go. Along with a bunch of stuff I haven’t reviewed. It’s also set up as a sequel to a manga/anime originally from the 60s. I’ll be up front, I haven’t seen or read that one, so I won’t know how well this one follows it. How does this one compare to Pierrot’s other works? Well, let’s have a look at it and see.

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Story:

We open with a black and white scene of a group of identical sextuplets being told that they’re getting a new anime after their long absence from the air. We’ll ignore the fact that identical sextuplets make no sense since it is a comedy. From there, we get a bunch of stand along gag episodes, most of which have multiple segments of varying lengths & art styles that may or may not be related. The humour involves a lot of fourth wall breaking, a lot of zany hijinks and a lot of gags about how the sextuplets are generally terrible and life deservedly kicks them down.

Honestly, the humour doesn’t always work. Most of the stuff prominently involving Dayon and/or Dekapan is just stupid. There’s also some humour that’s very much the puerile “we mentioned private parts” type. There are also some jokes where the set up is fine, but the pay off falls short.

That being said, the series does have a lot of really funny moments. Some with the sextuplets just having crazy hijinks and there are others that involve one shot gags about F6, girlmatsu or something else that might be called back to a few times but won’t have any impact on anything and involves a shift from the regular content. Then again, most of the segments don’t have an impact on any of the other segments. I will also credit this series for making me laugh at toilet humour twice. That’s not something that happens often. I usually just roll my eyes at it.

Characters:

This isn’t a series with complex characters. The characters are pretty basic, each one having some quirks. However, they do play off of each other pretty nicely and they’re varied enough that there are a lot of comedic possibilities. So, for comedic purposes they work well.

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Art:

The main art style is pretty simple, but there are a lot of things I appreciate about it. I like that the designs serve as a call back to the old series. At least they seem to based on screen shots I’ve seen. To reiterate, I haven’t seen Osomatsu-kun. I also like that Pierrot makes the sextuplets distinct enough that you can easily tell which is which in a group shot, even when it’s a group shot at the bath house and they aren’t wearing colour-coded shirts. I will also credit the series for being quite good at visual gags. It really is a case of simplicity not being a bad thing.

Sound:

They did get some really talented actors for this. Ono Daisuke, Fukuyama Jun, Irino Miyu, Kamiya Hiroshi, Nakamura Yuuichi & Sakurai Takahiro voice the brothers. And, as a whole, the performances are pretty good. There are times when they get a bit exaggerated for my liking, but they are generally strong. The music was composed by Hashimoto Yukari. She’s done a lot of music for series I’ve reviewed: Penguindrum, Yuri Kuma Arashi, the ending theme tune for Strike Witches, Upotte, & Toradora. As for her work here, it really suits the series. She does a great job.

Ho-yay:

There are a few jokes involving things looking homo-erotic or yaoi terms being used incorrectly, but that’s basically the extent of it.

Final Thoughts:

So, that was Osomatsu-san. Honestly, I kind of enjoyed it. I wouldn’t call it one of the best comedies I’ve seen, but it had plenty of funny moments and it kept me mostly entertained. As such, my final rating is going to be a 7/10. Next week will be this year’s film festival week. It all starts on Sunday with Dragonball: Shenron no Densetsu. And, if you’re wondering, yes there will still be a bonus review for April. It’s already written and it’s Doctor Who related because I felt we needed a change from superhero stuff.

Nanbaka: Because Comedies Need Tragic Back Stories, Apparently

Nanbaka is a prison comedy series. The manga was originally written by Futamata Shou. In late 2016, Satelight began airing an anime adaptation. You may remember them as the studio behind Heat Guy J & Sousei no Aquarion. So, how does this one compare to their other works I’ve reviewed? Let’s take a gander.

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Story:

Nanba is, supposedly, the world’s most formidable prison. With the toughest guards, the most inescapable perimeter, the sparkliest design and the finest dining and recreation services. We follow four prisoners, Juugo, Uno, Rock & Nico, who have escaped from prisons all over the world as they go about their lives and make trouble for the guards. Insert shenanigans here.

The biggest issue with this series is that it attempts to blend zany, really over the top comedy, with some more serious back stories and an underlying plot about a certain character having serious enemies who may well pose a threat. This results in a pretty significant case of tonal clash. Then we have the humour itself. Honestly, it doesn’t work a lot of the time. A lot of it is based around the characters being stupid or something over the top and random happening. I’ve talked about this before with a different less than good comedy, but randomness isn’t funny. A good zany, absurd comedy will have some internal logic that will be largely consistent, being bent on rare occasions for a jape. Pure randomness is what you get when an eight year old tries to make up a joke. “So, a guy walks into a pub and asks the bartender for a pint. The bartender says, ‘I can’t serve you. I’m a cockatoo.’ And the guy looks up and notices that he is.” And it’s not funny but you give them a pity chuckle because they’re eight. Problem is, this was written by an adult who should know better.

That being said, some of the goofs based around characters acting like idiots are pretty funny. There are times when those get executed well. I’ll give it credit on that, it does have some funny bits.

Characters:

The major inmates in this series can all be described very simply. They have a tragic back story and very little personality. Now, I have maintained that a comedy doesn’t need deep, complex characters. It needs characters with strong dynamics who can play off of one another really well to deliver the laughter. However, the whole tragic back stories element and the more serious stuff the series tries to do arguably makes this a series that should have more complex characters. Even putting that aside, the character dynamics are pretty underwhelming and don’t generally lead to good comedic moments. A lot of the side characters suffer from one joke syndrome. Take the Warden. Her joke is that she has a crush on Hajime, the guard in charge of our protagonists, and people misinterpret her intense gazes.

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Art:

The art isn’t very good, to put it nicely. While I will give it credit for having unique character designs, the backgrounds are pretty lazy. Additionally, Satelight made the perplexing decision to put everything in sparkle vision. I’m not kidding, the entire bloody anime is sparkly. Now, here’s the thing. Sparkle vision can work when used in certain circumstances for comedic effect. Fullmetal Alchemist is a great example. However, putting everything in constant sparkle vision doesn’t have any comedic effect. Instead, it just hurts your eyes.

Sound:

The cast in this is perfectly passable. I can’t call them brilliant in this, or even good, but it’s also one of those series where the acting can’t make up for the lack of characterisation. The music was handled by Fujisawa Kenji and it’s all right. Which may actually make it the strongest element of the series.

Ho-yay:

There’s a bit. We have the gay stereotype character voiced by Kimeru. Juugo also mentions liking both guys and girls, and there are reasons to believe he was serious.

Final Thoughts:

Nanbaka is a pretty weak comedy. It suffers from tonal problems, humour that falls flat more often than not, constant sparkle vision and dull characters. That being said, it does have its funny moments and I can’t really say it was bad. If you’re a fan of randomness and comedy stemming from characters being morons, you might enjoy it. For me, the final rating is going to be a 4/10. Next week I’ll look at Osomatsu-san, which will hopefully be a better class of comedy.

March Bonus Review: Justice League- Crisis On Two Earths

Crisis on Two Earths is an animated film from 2010. It was during the same period that a lot of DC animated films came out. So, how does this one in particular hold up?

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Story:

We open in a parallel world, just in case the title didn’t make it obvious that this film would be dealing with a parallel world. In this world, Lex Luthor is a hero and he’s working with another hero called the Jester. Obvious Joker analogue is obvious. The two of them are taking something from their world’s most powerful villains, The Crime Syndicate. Luthor manages to escape to the main DCU dimension and enlists the help of the Justice League to save his world. 

There are several major issues with this narrative. First off, the whole spiel of heroes fighting evil versions of themselves has been done in comics and comic-based media, a lot. And in terms of that narrative type, Crisis on Two Earths is pretty weak. The heroes end up in the predictable encounter where they all fight their own opposites and then it abruptly ends due to reasons. we also have a really contrived romantic sub-plot with J’onn J’onzz and Elseworld Rose Wilson. It contributes nothing and makes no sense. There’s also the ending. Throughout the story we see President Deathstroke and the authorities turn a blind eye to the Syndicate because “they’re too strong. We can’t stand up to them.” but, for all that, they manage to handle the syndicate with sickening ease when they actually try. His daughter may very well be completely right when she thinks of him as a coward since he apparently decided to kiss their backsides without a fight. 

On the positive side, there are some nice little action sequences. I also do like the way that Supes figures out that Luthor is from another dimension. I also do like that Bats brings up the whole debate  of whether or not they should be messing about trying to help this other Earth when theirs has plenty of its own problems. It’s something that really should have gotten more screen time than it does. Possibly in lieu of a pointless romantic sub-plot  because that would have made the film more compelling. 

Characters:

The characters are a bit mixed. Most of the major characters are recognisable as themselves and have a sense of personality. you also get a lot of side characters who show up for a couple minutes and have very little personality on display. Then there are the antagonists. The Crime Syndicate largely comes across as just evil for the evils. Maybe the film’s writers just wanted to make homage to the Silver Age and that’s why the villains have that level of complexity.

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Art:

The art is mostly pretty good. The character designs are nicely done. I do like that the Elseworld characters have very different looks than our heroes. A lot of the action sequences are also quite good. But then we get into those that aren’t so much. Like Bats fighting in the world’s shittiest robotic suit while trying to look like a badass. (It doesn’t work.)

Sound:

The vocal cast in this is heavily mixed. There are some actors who do pretty decently. Vanessa Marshall, Mark Harmon, Jonathan Adams & Chris Noth all do well enough. Then you’ve got a bunch of actors who are passable and some who are absolute rubbish. William Baldwin has to be the second worst sounding Batman I’ve ever heard. James Woods just sounds completely apathetic the whole time. Like he couldn’t be bothered to actually act. James Patrick Stuart’s fake accent for Johnny Quick is pretty bad too. The music is fine. 

Final Thoughts:

All in all, Crisis on Two Earths is pretty weak. The narrative is one we’ve seen before and better executed, a lot. The villains are weak. the performances vary from pretty decent to outright bad. If you’re just looking for some nice action with DC’s stable of heroes, you might enjoy it. Otherwise, it’s not bad, but it is below average. My final rating is a 4/10. 

Rurouni Kenshin: Some arcs are better than others

A while back I reviewed the OVA Rurouni Kenshin: Meiji Kenkaku Romantan- Tsuiokuhen. It was fantastic. During my review I mentioned that I’d never seen the series it was a prequel of. Well, we’re going to correct that now. Rurouni Kenshin: Meiji Kenkaku Romantan is a series that ran from January 96 to September 98. Studio Gallop began work on it, but it’s last third, roughly speaking, was finished up by Studio Deen. So, is the series as well done as its prequel? Let’s examine it and find out.

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Story:

Himura Kenshin is a wanderer, also known as a rurouni. Since the Meiji era began, he’s sworn off of killing and dedicates his new reversed blade to protecting. During his travels, he comes across the Kamiya dojo and the current master, Kamiya Kaoru. He quickly becomes attached to the people around him but there are questions looming over the whole situation. Can he stop his days of wandering? Will his past as a man slayer haunt his new life? Can he truly live as a swordsman without killing?

Honestly, the biggest problem with the series is the final arc. Basically, magic Feng Shui masters and stupidity happens. A lesser but more prevalent issue is with the romance. While it has potential, it never really goes anywhere. It quickly stagnates and just gets brought up occasionally to remind you that that’s still the dynamic betwixt our leads. Because they couldn’t possibly advance it in any significant way with only ninety episodes left. That would be crazy. There are also occasional joke moments that don’t work.

That being said, the series is mostly pretty compelling. We see Kenshin take on another man slayer, cultists, the conspiracy version of freemasons and more. One thing I do really like about the conflicts in this series goes back to something Kenshin talks about. The stronger person, the winner, isn’t necessarily in the right. You have to make up your own mind and fight for what you believe. So, the antagonists tend to be significantly more nuanced than you normally get in a long action-oriented series. I will also say that the story arcs, as a whole, are nicely paced. They don’t drag on so that Kenshin can spend ten episodes or so yelling to become stronger. The last one aside, the arcs are also good at keeping you invested. There’s always, with the aforementioned exclusion, something interesting about the situation.

Characters:

the character cast is certainly one of the strong points for the series. Every one of the major cast has a development arc that they undergo. At a more basic level, they’re all multi-faceted and feel very human. Which is true for the vast majority of the characters in the series be they supporting character, major character or antagonist. And there are a lot of them, so that’s pretty impressive. I also like that, unlike a lot of long, action-oriented series, none of the characters are ever reduced to irrelevance because they aren’t among the strongest. There was clearly an effort put into making these characters not just dynamic but different.

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Art:

The artwork is mostly well done. There are some issues here and there. The last episode tries to incorporate either real footage taken with a very low quality camera or an art style designed to look like it. Either way, it doesn’t mesh well. A lot of the fights in the whole Feng Shui arc are pretty bad. There’s a lot of Feng Shui masters holding things in front of them while motion lines happen. Some of the other action sequences can be a bit repetitive. This series loves the whole spiel where two swordsmen rush one another, you see them standing still and then one falls. That being said, the character designs are nice and distinct. I do love that Kenshin wears the whole pink robe, if only because it reminds me of Master Splinter. Some of them do delve into the whole shounen cliché of trying way too hard to be strange, particularly with some of the antagonists, but they don’t look bad. The backgrounds and set designs clearly had hard work put into them and most action sequences are nicely done, even when they are similar.

Sound:

The cast is pretty good. Suzukaze Mayo, Ueda Yuji, Fujitani Miki, Tominaga Miina, Sakurai Tomo & Doi Mika all do a good job and there are really no weak performances in the series. The music is quite good as well.

Ho-yay:

There’s a little bit. One of the antagonistic characters is a homosexual Gent with romantic feelings for the guy he’s serving.

Final Thoughts:

That’s Rurouni Kenshin. It has some flaws but, as a whole, it’s a really good series. The characters have depth. The writing has a sense of nuance and it certainly provides that action that the kids are into these days. My final rating is going to be a solid 8/10. Next week I’m looking at the first series of the prison comedy Nanbaka.

Karas: It has the Action

Karas is a six episode, original OVA written by Yoshida Shin and brought to us by Tatsunoko. That’s right, the same studio that brought us Kyattou Ninden Teyandee, SKET Dance & C: The Money of Soul and Possibility Control. Karas was actually their 40th anniversary work, beginning release in 2005 and ending in ’07. So, they must have put a lot of effort into it, right? Well, let’s look and see.

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Story:

There’s an unseen world alongside ours. The world of youkai. Unseen, they live alongside us in relative peace, or they did. Youkai with physical bodies combined with machines are threatening the balance and they’re out for human blood. It’s up to Yurine, the spirit of the city and her servant Karas, a being that’s neither fully human nor youkai, to bring down these youkai and their leader. The former Karas, Eko.

Let’s start with the obvious story problem. We’ve seen basically this exact story before, a lot. And Karas doesn’t really bring anything new to the table in terms of story telling or execution. Which results in a narrative that’s very trite and predictable. Every time they introduce a plot point, you know where they’re going to take it. That being said, I can give the series a little credit. They have creatures with a need to feed on blood and they actually think of using donated blood. The problem there is that it doesn’t work and there’s no reasonable explanation for why it doesn’t.

Characters:

The characters in this are slightly atypical, at least, a few of them are. Otoha is not your standard hero character. The Nue we spend a good chunk of time with is not a standard character. Eko, however, is a pretty generic villain. He’s one of those “I’m going to destroy everything because the world is rotten” types of villains. His followers are pretty much the same henchmen that villain always has. The human characters are pretty boring.

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Art:

This is most definitely a series that favours style over substance. With the big spectacle action sequences being the best part of the series. The artwork and animation in general are really good with some very impressive visuals and a unique aesthetic presentation. Yeah, there’s something in this series that actually stands out. However, you’d think they’d have done better with the final action sequence. The whole battle is like a formulaic JRPG boss fight where the big bad keeps revealing new forms only to have his actual final form be a bit anti-climactic and the battle from there being just over way too fast.

Sound:

The voice acting is competent. Not brilliant or even particularly good, but perfectly passable. The music from Ike Yoshihiro, however, is really good. The action sequence music especially. It is intense and bad ass.

Ho-yay:

There might be a little when we find out about Otoha’s past and the young man he almost ran away with.

Final Thoughts:

Karas isn’t a bad series. It has some strong art, animation and music. That being said, it’s not a good series either. The narrative itself is pretty weak, using ideas we’ve seen explored before and explored better and the characters are just average. My final rating is going to be a 5/10. It’s an average series. If you just want to see a spectacle of action and neat visuals, you’ll probably enjoy watching it but if you’re more interested in seeing strong characters and a unique story, you probably won’t be into it. Next week I’m finally reviewing Ruroni Kenshin.

Drifters: Historical Fan-fiction

Drifters is a science fiction, fantasy action, adventure manga written by Hirano Kouta. You may know him as the writer of Hellsing. At the tail end of 2016, an anime adaptation of Drifters aired. It was brought to us by Hoods Entertainment. A studio that I’ve never reviewed an anime by before. So, is Drifters a series that’s worth looking into?

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Story:

After the battle of Sekigahara, Shimazu Toyohisa finds himself in a strange, light corridor filled with doors. A spectacled man gestures and he gets pulled into one of them and directly into another world. He finds himself meeting Oda Nobunaga and Nasu Yoichi, two men who were recorded as having died before his time. It turns out that in this world of elves, dwarves, halflings and men, certain people from our world are being sent just before their deaths by the spectacled fellow in an effort to preserve the world from beings called “Ends,” who are also comprised of famous figures from our world, and their Black King. Shimazu and his new found companions, unaware of the ends and their threat, decide to lead a rebellion to save the elves from their forced servitude by a large, human nation.

The biggest flaw with the series goes back to our old friend, tone. This is one of those series that, in one vein, has really over the top violence and humour and, in an entirely different vein, tries to tackle some serious subject matter. Notably rape. Consequently, its handling these serious subjects for all of five minutes before going back to the absurdity and never mentioning them again comes across as more than a little tasteless. Although, in all fairness, there are only a few scenes like that. The ending is also pretty unsatisfying. It’s all setting up for the next series and, while it does have a degree of closure for one of the major plot threads, it doesn’t even bother giving you a climactic battle with any finality. For that matter, there’s very little aftermath. Certainly not enough to give us as the viewers a sense of what came from the whole thing beyond the very obvious.

On the positive side, I do like the concept of two opposing entities each scouring our history for figures they can use against one another. The series also does quite well when it’s staying in its comfort zone of over the top violence mixed with humour. It also does do a good job at keeping your interest since it has a lot of interwoven plot threads.

Let’s discuss a very mixed element with the series. The fluctuating complexity. We see our protagonists face the Orte Empire, a very uncomplex fascist nation. Right down to being founded by one of history’s most brutal monsters. They also face the Ends, who are heavily indicated to have more going for them than the initial impression indicates. We also have the Count of Saint Germain. Initially, he appears to be the gay stereotype that seems to pop up in anime because “he’s gay it’s funny.” However, there are several ways in which he goes beyond that and becomes a surprisingly complex character. And the anime is full of elements that seem shallow but get built on into something more and others that are just shallow

Characters:

The characters, at this juncture, are more potentially complex than they are actually complex. There are some, our main trio of heroes and the Count, who move beyond their archetypes in some ways. There are other Drifters and several characters among the Ends with potential, usually due to some connection with our heroes, but without anything tangible yet. The characters who are neither are just universally bland. Including the Count’s subordinates who are just the gay stereotypes.

Art:

This is a bit mixed mainly because there are two art styles in the series. There’s the “comedic” art style, which looks lazily rushed and like the artists just didn’t care. Then there’s the art style they use the rest of the time and it actually does look pretty great. The action sequences are fluid and intense. The character designs are detailed, although it should be noted that, in a bout of uncreative nonsense, the elves all look very similar as do the members of certain other fantasy races. The backgrounds are very nicely detailed under the normal style and basically non-existent with the comedic.

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Sound:

The acting is similar to the art in that it has two modes. There’s the over the top comedic mode where everyone sounds like seven year olds shouting the lines of their school play and there’s the regular mode which sounds pretty good. Nakamura Yuuichi, Uchida Naoya & Saiga Mitsuki all do very well at those points. The music was composed by Ishii Yasushi and Matsuo Hayato. Matsuo also worked on music for the first series of JoJo and Magic Knight Rayearth. All in all, it’s all right.

Ho-yay:

Aside from Germain and his companions, there’s a unit of muscular gay guys. Several men express attraction to Yoichi and there’s one line that may hint that Anastasia has a thing for Jeanne. It’s ambiguous.

Final Thoughts:

So, how does Drifters hold up when you factor in its good ideas with what it executes well, its tonal problems, its vast gaps in quality for both the art and voice acting, its inconsistent complexity and all of that? Well, I would say it’s all right. Honestly, it had the potential to be really good. For that matter, it could pretty easily become something really good, but as is, the first series has quite a few issues that hold it back. If you like the concept, you can handle the dip in quality for the big comedic bits and you can forgive the occasional tonal awkwardness, you might enjoy it. For myself, I’ll give it a 6/10. Next week I’ll look at Karas.

JoJo no Kimyou na Bouken:Stardust Crusaders 2: All of the Abs

I’ve talked about JoJo twice now. The first series and the first series of Stardust Crusaders. So far, it’s been an entertaining series full of over the top absurdity and machismo. So, let’s recap the first series of Stardust Crusaders and see where we are. Dio Brando returned, with his head attached to Jonathan’s body. Thanks to his influence the Joestar line including our protagonist, Joutarou, developed powers called Stands. In order to save his mother, who wasn’t strong enough to control her Stand, Joutarou set off on a journey with his grandfather, Joseph, and several other companions; Avdol, Kakyouin & Polnareff. The five made their way to Egypt, clashing with Stand users sent by Dio. When we’d left off, they’d taken a submarine and were very close to arriving in Egypt. With the clock running out for Holly, can this group of manly men stop Dio in time? Let’s delve into JoJo no Kimyou na Bouken: Stardust Crusaders series 2 and find out.

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Story:

We open with our heroes travelling in the desert when a helicopter from the Speedwagon foundation shows up to drop off a stand user to aid them. This is Iggy, a small black and white dog. Our heroes are also told that Dio’s recruited a bunch of other Stand users, these ones with stands based on the Egyptian pantheon instead of the major arcana in tarot. Undeterred, they continue their journey, challenging Dio’s stand users with names based off of musicians as they continue to their climactic battle.

As is the trend in this franchise, the story is pretty light. They encounter a stand user. There’s a battle. They get one step closer to Dio until the end when we reach our climactic clash. It’s a basic plot and it has all the subtlety of a steam roller. That being said, it works for the whole over the top absurdity that the franchise is going for. The biggest problem with the whole series is that there are some cohesion problems. For example, the way Dio’s stand works. We’re told it lasts for a specific amount of time, but the characters have an awfully long time to monologue, converse and still act considering the amount of time it’s supposed to work. One might even say that there’s no conceivable way for them to do all the things they do in the supposed time frame. The effect that Dio’s blood has on other people is also inconsistent. The final battle also involves a pretty blatant case of a character gaining a new ability he’s never shown any indication of having before. Hooray for plot contrivance.

Now, you can forgive those issues to a degree since the series is more over the top absurdity than serious. And I will credit it, as the other instalments, for being quite good at that. It is an entertaining series to watch and there are some surprisingly good dramatic moments too. Suzi Q visiting her ailing daughter. The scenes where certain major characters die are surprisingly good, given that this isn’t a complex cast.

Characters:

The cast of characters remains very much archetypical but with the occasional moment where they surpass that. JoJo and his amazing friends remains an endearing little band of heroes. Dio is still the least subtle villain since the Abomination. His minions either have no motivation behind serving him or they’re serving him because he’s strong. The musical artist naming scheme is very much intact. We have such characters as the brothers Oingo & Boingo, Vanilla Ice, the D’arby brothers, Mariah and so on.

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Art:

I do like to poke fun at this series a bit for the blokes being over-muscled with abs for days and for having action sequences where posing scenes are an important part, but I have to admit that the style does have its charm. It’s the overly macho aesthetic that just suits the series. I’ll also continue to give the franchise credit for having a lot of unique, interesting action sequences. Although this particular series loses some credit for putting the focus on Mariah’s ass for no reason during her episodes. That’s not how class works. Also for having a dog in the main cast but drawing it oddly enough that it’s really not cute like an actual dog.

Sound:

There’s a lot of exaggeration in this series. Throughout most of it, the lines are delivered in a very deliberate, over the top way. The actors can be more subtle at times, especially when dealing with something tragic, but expect a lot of yelling and loud declarations. I will say that both Koyasu Takehito & Ishizuka Unshou excel at going from the over the top ridiculous lines to the quieter, more subdued ones. The soundtrack is pretty decent. It’s definitely weaker than the music in the first Stardust Crusaders series, but it’s all right.

Ho-yay:

The closest you get to ho-yay is a really absurd scene where a couple blokes get stuck together.

Final Thoughts:

If you’ve seen the other two series in the franchise, you know roughly what to expect with this one. Absurd machismo dripping from its every frame. Exaggerated dialogue and performances. Creative, interesting battles. If you’re a fan of that kind of aesthetic, you’ll probably like it and I can’t say I didn’t enjoy myself watching it. Although, I didn’t like it as much as the first part of Stardust Crusaders. My final rating for JoJo no Kimyou na Bouken: Stardust Crusaders series 2 is going to be a 7/10. And next week I’ll be reviewing Drifters.