Kuuchuu Buranko: With shifting artwork for an ocular cacophony.

Kuuchuu Buranko is based on a series of short stories by Okuda Hideo. The stories have been adapted into multiple live action films, a television drama and this anime series from Toei animation. That’s right, the same studio behind Dragonball, Sailor Moon, Precure, Digimon and many other anime. So, how did they do with this series? Let’s delve in.

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Story:

Irabu is a psychologist who works with all kinds of patients. The series basically covers eleven of his cases. What their neuroses are and how he treats them. All in a way that’s supposed to be comedic.

But that’s also the big flaw of the series. It’s largely not actually funny. A lot of the humour is supposed to come from shifting art styles, Irabu’s weird fetish for vitamin shots, his patients being shown with animal heads and other things that aren’t actually funny. They’re strange, certainly, but strange doesn’t necessarily equate to comedic. Part of the issue is just that the setups are all pretty similar. We get a glimpse of the patient and their problem. Irabu has them given an injection and then we see them go about their lives for a bit while Irabu follows them to dispense advice and then we get a small indication that things are going fine for them before the episode ends. For a series that relies so much on surreal artwork the comedy is all rather sterile and predictable. From a comedic standpoint, it’s pretty lacklustre. Another issue is that the attempts at comedic content are distracting enough to undermine the series’ more serious elements

That being said, the series does keep your attention pretty well. Seeing the daily lives of the various people and how they carry on while trying to control their mental problems can be interesting. I also appreciate that the series does inform you of how the illnesses its portraying actually work or if they’re pure fiction, as one is, instead of claiming to be any kind of accurate representation of those illnesses.

Characters:

In terms of characters, this is a kind of odd series. The major characters don’t have much to them. Irabu is just kind of quirky. His nurse, Mayumi, doesn’t have much personality aside from being kind of cold. The side characters ie the patients, however, get pretty nicely fleshed out. The series spends time setting them up and the bulk of them are fleshed out, believable characters. Which is a big part of why the psychological aspect of the series does generally work.

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Art:

The series has an art style unlike any other series I’ve seen. There are a good three or four different art styles and the series mixes them together, shifts between them and it results in a pretty surreal atmosphere. That being said, there is one major failing to the whole thing. It’s way too damn busy. The combination of bright primary colours and shifting artwork can be physically painful to look at. There were multiple points where I had to stop watching in the middle of an episode, take off my spectacle and rest my eyes for a while before continuing. Especially since it’s pretty constant. Even putting the discomfort aspect aside, it just comes across as half ocular cacophony and half surreal.

Sound:

The acting is another heavily mixed element. The series did get some good actors, Paku Romi & Mitsuya Yuuji being the big ones, and they sound fine when they’re talking normally, but they frequently don’t speak normally. They operate with loud, exaggerated, bombastic performances that make Brian Blessed sound subtle. Irabu’s character, voiced at times by both of the aforementioned actors, is the worst when it comes to that. Whenever you see him with a mouse’s head, he sounds ear-bleedingly obnoxious. The music is brought to us by Mori Hideharu, who also worked on the music for Black Rock Shooter TV. It’s all right. I wasn’t super fond of it but I also didn’t dislike it.

Ho-yay:

There really isn’t any in this series.

Final Thoughts:

When it comes right down to it, the big issue with Kuuchuu Buranko is that there’s so much about it that’s overblown. A lot of the acting is bombastic. The artwork is overdone to the point where it can be painful. The comedy relies on things being overly strange and the other exaggerated factors. That being said, the psychological elements generally do work but I don’t know if I can recommend it on that basis since this is a psychological comedy and the comedic elements generally don’t work. Ultimately, it’s a pretty average series. My final rating is a 5/10. The stuff that does work works well and the stuff that doesn’t gravitates towards being obnoxious. If you want something a bit different and you like psychological elements, it might keep you entertained. If you want the comedic or dramatic elements, you’ll probably be disappointed. Next week I’ll look at something else psychological with Haibane Renmei. Until then, keep being fabulous.

Binbougami Ga: Reminding you that famous anime exist

Binbougami Ga is a comedic shounen series written by Sukeno Yoshiaki. The manga ran from 2008 to 2013. At the tail end of the manga’s run Sunrise, the studio behind Gundam, Cowboy Bebop, Code Geass & Love Live to name a few, worked on a thirteen episode anime adaptation. How well does the anime version hold up? Let’s check it out.

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Story:

Sakura Ichiko is blessed with great fortune, far more than a regular human possesses. In fact, she unconsciously steals fortune from the people around her, ensuring her own good luck. In order to maintain the balance betwixt fortune & misfortune, the Gods of misfortune send Binboda Momiji to Earth. Her mission, drain Ichiko’s fortune and prevent her stealing anyone else’s. This quickly results in various schemes and shenanigans as Ichiko tries to protect her own interests and the battle between the lucky girl and the Goddess of misfortune is joined.

The biggest issue with the series is that a good portion of the humour isn’t just trite and predictable, but it’s flimsy at the best of times. We get the stereotypical perverted monk/master/priest that’s oh so generic and played out. We also get the masochistic gag character who just wants to be hit by pretty girls. The only twist to him is that he’s a dog God in this. We also get the fan-service jokes, which basically operate under the assumption that shameless fan-service isn’t shameless fan-service if it acknowledges that it’s shameless fan-service. We also get references used as jokes. This series courageously acknowledges that such series as Dragonball, Doraemon & Lupin exist. Because those are just such obscure series that the audience might have forgotten them. All without making any kind of humorous statements about them that might elevate those references to parody.

That being said, the series does have its funny moments. A lot of the competitive stuff with Ichiko & Momiji works pretty nicely, when they leave out the monk and the dog God or hurriedly toss them to the refuse bin where they belong. The series is at its best when it blurs the boundaries of Ichiko & Momiji’s relationship. Those moments where they seem more friendly and less like actual enemies. There are also some good comedic moments with Ranmaru. The more emotional scenes involving the three of them do work quite nicely at times. Aside from that, though, the more serious scenes tend to be just bland.

Characters:

The characters vary quite a bit. There are some like Ichiko, Momiji & Ranmaru who are decent enough for the sake of a comedy. Then there are characters like Bobby, Momoo & the trio of girls who really hate Sakura who exist solely for one repeated, unfunny joke or to add cheap, completely unnecessary drama. Which is also the primary reason that the scenes with the three main ladies are the best in the series.

Art:

The biggest problem with the art is that it’s overly fond of fan-service. Or it would be, except that it magically doesn’t count because the series acknowledges it. Does that line of non-reasoning actually work on anyone? On the positive side, there are some good visual gags here and there and some nice visuals for some of the altercations between Ichiko & Momiji. The negative and those few positives aside, the artwork is passable. Not good, but not bad either.

Sound:

The acting isn’t badly done. The biggest problem with it is that there’s a lot of exaggerated yelling. They got some skilled actresses for the leads: Uchiyama Yumi, Hanazawa Kana & Tomatsu Haruka have all given some strong performances before, but this isn’t one of the better ones for any of them. Although, in all fairness, it isn’t a bad one either. Their performances here are just kind of okay overall. There are times when they really work and there are times where they don’t. The worst performances come from Shimono Hiro & Kawahara Yoshihisa. Not because they’re bad actors but because their characters are incessantly obnoxious. The music is another aspect that greatly varies. Some of it is quite nice, I actually really liked the opening theme. Other parts of it are kind of annoying and not well done.

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Ho-yay:

There are some points where Momiji and Ichiko not only seem friendly, but seem to be attracted to one another. Particularly towards the end of the series. Ranmaru also gets some female admirers, but they treat her like she’s a boy so it barely counts.

Final Thoughts:

Binbougami Ga is one of those series that’s highly mixed. Every positive aspect of it is balanced out by something negative. It’s not a bad series, nor is it a good one. All in all, it’s pretty mediocre. My final rating is going to be a 5/10. Next week I’ll be looking at Kuuchuu Buranko. Until then, have a fabulous time.

Non Non Biyori: Out in the country

Are you all ready for another slice of life comedy about a group of ladies? I’ve reviewed quite a few of these and, to be fair, they’re usually enjoyable enough. Non Non Biyori came out, in anime form, in late 2013. It’s based on a still ongoing manga by Atto that started in 2009. The anime was brought to us by Silver Link, the same studio behind Baka to Test, WataMote, Rakudai Kishi no Cavalry &, the only good thing I’ve seen from them thus far, Yuri Kuma Arashi. I have to say, that pedigree does not inspire confidence. But let’s take a look at the series and see if it can bring Silver Link’s numbers up to two worthwhile anime.

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Story:

We open in the country with a school where one teacher takes care of all the elementary and middle school students. Her job may sound terribly difficult until you learn that she has all of five students. Our main characters are the four girls in the class. The first grader, Renge. Fifth grader Hotaru. Seventh grader, Natsumi & her older sister, eighth grader Komari. The four of them enjoy their quiet and peaceful lives while keeping one another company and interacting with the friendly folks in their little country town.

Okay, so the ways this slice of life series about a group of girls differentiates itself from other slice of life series about groups of girls is with the country setting and the fairly substantial age differences among the girls. To be fair, that is a pretty big difference and the series is good at taking advantage of both the setting and the age gaps for the sake of humour.

That being said, the humour isn’t always on the mark. There are times where they’ll rely on doing something odd to be fun without regard to the fact that odd does not necessarily equate to funny. This does result in some jokes that fall flat.

Characters:

The characters in this are pretty nicely done. They aren’t the most complex group out there, but they are nicely fleshed out without being overly exaggerated. Resulting in characters who have a nice level of verisimilitude. The character interactions are also nicely done. A lot of the funniest scenes in the series revolve around the interactions. In fact, the best comedic moments in this series may all stem from Hotaru’s interactions with Komari. It’s not just the comedy, I’ll also give the series credit for having some strong emotional moments that just explore the connections among the characters. Particularly with Renge & Kaede, a side character who runs the candy store. That being said, some of the side characters are a bit weak. You get some sense of personality from them, but it’s not much. Like the one male student who never talks and is just kind of a supportive brother to Konami & Natsumi or Renge’s eldest sister, who acts as the school teacher and has a lazy shtick going.

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Art:

The artwork in this is quite good. Particularly the nature scenes and backgrounds. The nature scenery in this is really superb. The characters look fine, but they’re also pretty typical of the genre. The various objects that the characters interact with are nicely detailed.

Sound:

Our major characters are voiced by Murakawa Rie (GochiUsa’s Megumi), Asumi Kana (Neptunia’s Blanc), Sakura Ayane (Love Live’s Arisa) & Koiwai Kotori. The four of them give strong performances. As does Satou Rina. The biggest weakness is Nazuka Kaori. Wile she is a good actress, as evidenced by her performances in Code Geass, Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood & Soul Eater, her character in this just doesn’t have much going for her so she spends the entire anime sounding mellow without any real emotional variation.

Ho-yay:

There’s a bit. Hotaru openly has a massive crush on Komari. There’s also some indication that the feelings are reciprocated. I wouldn’t be surprised if the two of them ended up dating at some point. Probably won’t last, given their young ages, though. Then again, if Nanoha and Fate can make it work, it’s possible.

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Final Thoughts:

That was Non Non Biyori. It holds up pretty strongly. The characters are memorable and endearing. The nature scenes are lovely and it has enough differences from the standard slice of life series to keep it fresh. That being said, I wouldn’t call it one of the best out there, since the humour does fall short at times. But if you want something cutesy with some very strong character interactions, this might be for you. My final rating is going to be a solid 8/10. Next week I’ll take a look at Binbougami ga.

Terra Formars Revenge: Someone get Mars some Raid.

Terra Formars was a weak action series with shallow characters and many failed attempts at adding depth. But hey, at least it was grim and gritty and we don’t get nearly enough grim and gritty works of media, if you ignore the tens of thousands too many that we get. Okay, so the last series ended with our heroes stranded on Mars. One full squadron has been killed, one is made up of traitors, and I’m sure it’s not the one that was reported dead but we saw alive and well, and our heroes have to find their way back to Earth with some living derp roaches in order to stop a disease. Let’s look at where things go in Terra Formars: Revenge, and see if we can find any reason to care.

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Story:

We pick up where the last series left off. In this one the focus shifts to the struggle of the traitorous fourth squadron against the other squadrons, primarily the first and second since the fourth wants to capture what’s her name and that one guy. So, the 4th squadron takes control of the fallen ship, making it their base and goes all out, doing whatever it takes, to capture that one guy and whatever her name was. Meanwhile, the first and second squadron have to evade the derp roaches and find a way to strike back at the 4th squadron.

I will give this series some credit over the first. There’s a lot less of an issue with both exposition, since those scenes are shortened quite a bit for this one. There’s also less of a problem with solutions for various problems being completely pulled out of the writer’s posterior. This series focuses much more on largely mindless action sequences coming one after the other with the series’ attempt to add some depth betwixt them. That being said, flashbacks are a massive pain in this one. The first series used them quite a bit, mainly in attempts to make us care about the characters, but this one takes it to the next level. A lot of the big climactic stuff at the end gets interrupted by long, drawn out flashbacks. Plus, we get the same flashback of the protagonist boy talking to a sick child from the first series so many times you’d think it would be showing us how he learned that “with great power there must come great responsibility.” Granted, I wouldn’t have remembered such a dull scene without them doing a flashback but I didn’t need them to keep bringing it up. This series is also overly fond of fake-outs. The series loves to move things to a bleak note only to reveal that there’s still a glimmer of hope or that things went okay after all and we just didn’t see it. Here’s the thing with both flashbacks and fake-outs. They’re both useful tools when used in moderation but when they’re overdone, like they are here, they quickly become tired. Fake-outs in particular since they don’t work when you expect them. This series also has some tonal issues. There are scenes that attempt to add some levity which is a good idea, in concept. The problem here is that they’ll stick the scenes in randomly during moments that are supposed to be tense. For example, they have two characters who are surrounded by derp roaches and they insert a comedic bit about skunks, which just undermines the tension completely.

Again, the concept has potential and I do still give them credit for trying to be more than just mindless action, but the execution is just poor and the effort doesn’t ultimately mean much.

Characters:

I feel like I could basically copy and paste my whole rant about the characters from the first series with some minor tweaks. I won’t, but I could. The big problem with the characters in this is just that they’re boring. There’s nothing to them beyond the same trite action archetypes that we’ve seen time after time. The most attempts we get at developing them are in flashbacks that serve to show us that they had equally bland families who they’re fighting for or some generically tragic back stories. But there’s nothing in there that really adds depth to them or that fleshes them out as a character. The result is that there’s no reason to care what happens in the fight betwixt squadron four and the others or betwixt the humans and the goofy roaches.

The roaches continue to be weak villains. Yes, they have numbers and they can overwhelm the heroes we don’t have any reason to care about, but at the same time they just look absurd. The changelings in Friendship is Magic looked scarier than these things. Plus, every major hero can still slaughter a large number of them with relative ease.

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Art:

The artwork continues to be the area where I can give the series some praise. The backgrounds are nicely detailed. The human characters have some nice designs, particularly when you factor in their transformations. The action sequences, though incredibly violent, do have some nice intensity.

Sound:

Like with the first series, I have to give the cast some credit. They take characters who really have very little to them and they still manage to turn out passable performances. Not good by any means, but passable. This time around Wada Takafumi handles the soundtrack and, I have to say, it’s not as good as Murai Shusei’s was in the first series. It’s all right, but that’s about the best that can be said for it.

Ho-yay:

There might be a little. There’s a girl named Hong who seems to have a thing for one of her comrades, Miss Xi. But it’s hard to say since the character interactions are so… meh.

Final Thoughts:

That’s Terra Formars Revenge. It shares some of the weaknesses of the original, improves in some areas and gets worse in others. Overall, it’s a dumb action series that’s trying to be more, but failing. Ultimately, I don’t think it’s worse than the first series nor do I think it’s better. My final rating is going to be the same a 4/10. I still have no reason to care what’s happening. If your only issue with the first series was the excessive exposition that interrupted the action sequences, you might like this one better. If you, like me, were not fond of the first series or you didn’t bother with it because it didn’t look like something you’d be into, I don’t recommend this one either. If you really liked the first series, the flashbacks, fake-outs and comedic attempts might make you dislike this one but I suspect you’ll be fine with it. Next week I’ll take a look at Non Non Biyori. Until then, have a fantastic week.

Mononoke Hime: Ending Film Festival Week on a High Note

Mononoke Hime is a 1997 Studio Ghibli film written and directed by the legendary Miyazaki Hayao. It’s also frequently brought up alongside Nausicaä & Spirited Away as one of Ghibli’s classics. Does it hold up as well as those two films? Let’s take a look.

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Story:

We open in a small village coming under attack by a demon God, which looks kind of like a boar covered in small, squat tendrils. In order to protect his people, Prince Ashitaka rides into action. He manages to stop the rampaging beast, but its tendrils grasp his arm, leaving a scar that won’t abate and continues to increase in size. He’s told that it’s curse and will eventually claim his life. So, his people send him out into the world to try and find a cure while examining things with unveiled eyes. It doesn’t take him long to encounter a situation where the people of a prosperous little town seem to be at war with the creatures of the forest, including a girl who lives with the wolves as one of their own.

I can’t really criticise anything about the narrative in this film. The pacing is perfect, using slow and atmospheric scenes as well as more tense action scenes effectively while striking a good balance betwixt the two. The major theme concerning humanity and how we interact with the environment is superbly handled, aided by the fact that the opposing sides are both portrayed as sympathetic and as having some validity to their viewpoints. While our main protagonist tries to encourage a balanced approach. The scope itself is also really grandiose, in spite of most of the action occurring in one city and the adjacent forest. The climax is excellent, with a pressing problem and our heroes being very much on a timer, which helps make it a very intense experience. I also appreciate that not everything gets wrapped up. We’re ultimately shown a situation that’s going to require more work but it still ends on a satisfying note in spite of that.

Characters:

The characters are about as expertly done as you can get. While it is true that the side characters are less developed, they still have verisimilitude. You can very much look at them and see them like actual people. I also do like that all the major characters have sympathetic aspects to them,. They all have things at stake that they don’t want to surrender and there are compelling reasons for them to not just sit down and come to a compromise even though it would ultimately be to their benefit to do so. Having an outsider like Ashitaka as the main focus character allows the film to examine both sides of the conflict and see that balance in a way that the characters involved in it can’t. I also do love San and her lupine family. A lot of works centring around a “feral” child raised by animals will focus on the more beastly aspects but this one shows a lot of the tenderness and love that you see from actual wolves when they interact with their cubs. Which also, in an odd way, lends a very human element to it.

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Art:

The artwork and animation are fantastic. The world the film creates is lively, vivid and even sublime. The backgrounds are really well detailed. The fantastic creatures of various varieties are fascinating and just have amazing designs. The animals and people are nicely detailed. The action sequences are awesome. It’s just an excellent looking film. Which isn’t all that surprising given that Studio Ghibli is known for their superb artwork. Even the films of theirs that I wasn’t fond of have had amazing animation.

Sound:

The vocal work was really well done. Ishida Yuriko, Matsuda Youji & Miwa Akihiro in particular just gave outstanding performances. The music composition was handled by Hisaishi Joe, who also worked on the music in Ponyo, Howl’s Moving Castle & Spirited Away. His work in those was all very well done and pleasant, but this film might have the best I’ve heard from him. The compositions are stupendous and really add to the atmosphere.

Ho-yay:

There isn’t any. What little romance we get is het.

Final Thoughts:

Mononoke Hime is just fantastic. The atmosphere, story, characters, artwork, music and acting are all excellent. It absolutely deserves a spot among Ghibli’s finest films. My final rating for it is going to be a 10/10. If you want to see a fantasy film with some amazing action & a nuanced approach when it comes to its environmental themes, I highly recommend it. So, that’s it for film festival week. Next Wednesday I’ll return to my weekly schedule with a look at Terra Formars: Revenge.

Totsuzen! Neko no Kuni Banipal Witt: Trippy

Totsuzen! Neko no Kuni Banipal Witt is a 1995 film brought to us by our old friends at Studio Hibari, whom you may recall from their work on Kashimashi & Venus Versus Virus. So, how do these folks handle a children’s film and is it going to be any better than their track record would indicate? Let’s give it a shot and delve in.

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Story:

Papadoll has gone missing. His smallest human, Meeko, is convinced that he’s been kidnapped by aliens but her brother, Toriyasu, doesn’t take her seriously. In fact, the little brat doesn’t seem to care saying that Papadoll just lay about all day anyway. That’s when Meeko notices a strange cat observing them. That night, three strange cats burst into their room, wanting to take Toriyasu away. Meeko insists on going along.

The big flaw with the film on a narrative level is that it’s paced pretty awkwardly. You get a long, kind of boring scene where the characters plan their next move intermixed with scenes of what the antagonists are doing and ending with an action sequence that’s welcome, at first, but just drags after a while And the film is barely an hour and a quarter long so the way the scenes still manage to drag, even if just a bit, is kind of a big deal.

On the positive side, the concept behind this is fairly creative. I also do like that it makes a big theme of Toriyasu being forced to come to terms with his own behaviour and how it’s contributed to the problem. There aren’t many works of children’s media that demand that level of self-reflection.

Characters:

The characters vary a bit as well. Some of the dynamics come across as contrived and don’t work very well. The whole conflict turned into a kind of creepily close respect between Toriyasu & ChuChu being the prime example. A lot of the side characters are also pretty one-note. However, I do have to give the film some credit. Toriyasu’s character arc works quite well. The antagonist, Buburina, is pretty terrible but she’s not just the purely evil villain you get in a lot of children’s media. She does have redeeming qualities. She may not be at the level of a Ghibli villain, but it does give her some dimension.

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Art:

The art also varies. One the negative side, the character designs don’t look very good. That being said, a lot of the backgrounds are creative and interesting. The whole world of Banipal Witt looks like a drug-induced hallucination. It’s almost like Hibari took visual inspiration from Apple Films’ opus, Yellow Submarine. It’s a very strange looking world, but one with a lot of atmosphere. The film’s action scenes also work quite nicely.

Sound:

The cast is pretty decent. Hiroaki Hori, Sasaki Mirai & Hidaka Noriko all do quite well. Saegusa Shigeaki handles the music and it works nicely enough.

Ho-yay:

Don’t expect any. To be fair, an emphasis on romance really wouldn’t work for the film in general.

Final Thoughts:

Totsuzen! Neko no Kuni Banipal Witt was actually pretty enjoyable. Yes, it could have been better, particularly in some areas. However, it’s also creative and interesting enough in its own right. My final rating is going to be a 7/10. Tomorrow I’ll end this year’s film festival week with a look at Mononoke Hime.

Hanare Toride no Yonna: Stupid, but at least short.

Hanare Toride no Yonna is a CGI film from CoMix Wave Films. You may remember them from Hoshi wo ou Kodomo & Byousoku 5 Centimeter. This film was released in 2006. So, how does it hold up compared to the other CoMix Wave Films productions I’ve seen? Let’s check it out and see.

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Story:

We open with a brother and sister going about their daily lives. Then a strange boy comes by, sees the sister and scarpers. We cut to an indeterminate amount of time later when the siblings are living together in a fortress without anyone else nearby and a young man is trying to break in and it might seem like I’m skipping crucial plot details, but that’s exactly how the information is presented to us.

Therein lies the first major flaw of the series. The story is all over the place. While you do eventually gather why the siblings are on their own, it gets thrown at you far later than it should be and in a stilted exposition dump. Which is a general problem with the dialogue, actually. Nothing sounds natural. The pacing is also pretty bad with the story rushing through things that need more time and wasting time on random scenes where Yonna interacts with little imps.

Characters:

The biggest issue with the characters in this film is that their motivations are vague, ill-defined and don’t really make that much sense. Stan’s motivation seems to be wanting what’s best for his sister, which would make sense, but he also doesn’t seem to give a shit what she thinks or has to say. Yonna has a vague “wanting more” motivation but she somehow needs someone else to taker her away from solitude instead of just talking to her brother. Garuda starts out doing a mission but decides to help Yonna for no adequately explored reason. So, ultimately, you get motivations that are both one-dimensional and nonsensical.

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Art:

The art in this looks pretty bad. It’s not the first time I’ve reviewed something with bad CGI animation and I doubt it’ll be the last. The big issues are with the movements, which look janky and awkward and with the facial expressions, which largely look like “dull surprise.”

Sound:

The acting and music aren’t bad. They aren’t good, but there’s also not a lot that’s wrong with them. About the worst I can say is that Mitsuhashi Kanako & Kenn both under-act a bit.

Ho-yay:

There isn’t much in terms of romance at all.

Final Thoughts:

Hanare Toride no Yonna is a pretty bad film. The story is nonsense. The characters don’t have anything to them. The artwork looks terrible and the sound is weak. That being said, it isn’t one of the worst things I’ve ever reviewed. It’s mainly just kind of stupid and boring. My final rating is going to be a 3/10. Tomorrow I’ll continue film festival week with Totsuzen! Neko no Kuni Banipal Witt.